Greenough

Lingering Look at More Heritage Windows

Hampton Arms Bar

Hampton Arms Bar

 

The Hampton Arms Hotel was built in 1863 and we had a delicious lunch there after we went back in time last Sunday, as we followed the Greenough heritage trail. These are a few more windows from that drive.

Look at the thickness of the walls.

Look at the thickness of the walls.

This added a touch of whimsy

This added a touch of whimsy

 

This heritage store is waiting for renovation and the corrugated sheets keep prowlers out.

This heritage store is waiting for renovation and the corrugated sheets keep prowlers out.

 

You have already seen "Home Cottage " in another post but I had to add just one more window from that lovely old house/museum

You have already seen “Home Cottage ” in another post but I had to add just one more window from that lovely old house/museum

 

Another interesting building is the old goal in Geraldton. It has been well-preserved and is now used as a craft shop with each small cell used as a display of hand-made crafts.

Door into the cell with a well barred window

Door into the cell with a well barred window

This small patch of sky is all you can see from inside the cell

This small patch of sky is all you can see from inside the cell

 

This small window is high up on the wall

This small window is high up on the wall

 

Even the skylights are barred. No getting out of this goal.

Even the skylights are barred. No getting out of this goal.

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Dawn from her blog “The Day After”  encourages us to look for interesting windows and link them to her challenge “Lingering Look at Windows”. So this week I am showing you a few more windows I found as we followed the heritage trail.

Categories: Geraldton, Greenough, Lingering look at windows, photos, Western Australia | Tags: , , , , , | 31 Comments

Exploring Greenough River : Jo’s Monday Walk.

The Greenough River, at the moment, is a tranquil, meandering water-way. There is a 17 kilometre walk-way that takes you along one side then back along the other bank. We decided to cheat a bit and drive from one section to the next and walk in between. So technically this is a drive-walk-drive-walk…

The impressive barber pole striped Point Moore lighthouse, built in 1879, was the first stop for a walk onto the beach.

Leaving Hector in the car park we head for the beach

Leaving Hector in the car park we head for the beach

 

Come on Pauline, hurry up

Come on Pauline, hurry up

Clear blue sky reflecting in the water

Clear blue sky reflecting in the water

The 4WDs can drive along the beach, it is firm sand, and they can launch their boats to go out for a day’s fishing.

Looking in the other direction the beach sweeps around the bay

Looking in the other direction the beach sweeps around the bay

At the river mouth of the Greenough River a couple of fishermen try their luck

At the river mouth of the Greenough River a couple of fishermen try their luck

Now it is back into the vehicle to drive a short distance inland to the start of the river walk.

The start of the walk

The start of the walk

The recent rain has made the grass grow and the shrubs are sprouting new leaves. It will be a good wild flower season this year.

Greenough River

Greenough River, wide and tranquil as it flows to the ocean.

3 canoeists paddle slowly along.

3 canoeists paddle slowly along.

This bloke has brought along his best friend

This bloke has brought along his best friend

We disturb this bird and he spots us and flies away before I can get any closer for a better photo.

We disturb this bird and he spots us and flies away before I can get any closer for a better photo.

As the river meanders further inland it narrows to a stream

As the river meanders further inland it narrows to a stream

A small bridge takes us across Devlins Pool

A small bridge takes us across Devlins Pool

We are not the only ones using this track.

We are not the only ones using this track.

Time is passing and it is past lunch time so it is time to go back to Hector and find some where for lunch.

Still following the river I am searching for Hampton Arms an old wayside inn built in 1863.

Maley's bridge was built by ticket-of-leave convicts in 1864 and has weathered many floods and storms

Maley’s bridge was built by ticket-of-leave convicts in 1864 and has weathered many floods and storms. It is a very solid construction.

We found it.

We found it.

 

Hampton Arms Inn

Hampton Arms Inn

 the two-storey stone and iron building, which had single-storey wings each side of the main section and a stone stable block, was an excellent example of the Victorian Regency style.

“Unlike other surviving buildings which once functioned as inns, the Hampton Arms was a purpose-built hotel,” she said. “Francis Pearson, who designed the first smelter in Western Australia and was a key figure in the early settlement of the Mid-West, built the hotel in 1863 with his two sons.”

The Hampton Arms was officially opened on May 1,1863 and named after John Hampton, Governor of the day. The district’s first ploughing match was held in 1868, adjacent to the hotel and for several decades it was a centre of social life. However, hard times and economic developments began to affect conditions in the area. By the 1870s a series of droughts, floods and fires had reduced the cropping capabilities of the region, which had been important in supplying the colony with much needed flour supplies. A disastrous flood in 1888 further reduced the area’s profitability and population and when the Midland to Walkaway railway line was completed in 1894, road traffic along the Perth-Geraldton road decreased. The combination of these events led to a decline in patronage of the Hampton Arms and eventually it closed in the 1890s. The building was used as farmhouse and gradually deteriorated until it was bought in 1978 by Alistair and Robin McKechnie, who began restoration work. They opened a restaurant in 1979 and completed work on the ballroom in 1981, subsequently being granted the first Historic Inn licence in WA.”

It was almost 2pm but meals were still being served, so we ordered then had a look around.

We decided to sit in the court yard for our meal. The single story wing is a treasure trove of second hand books

We decided to sit in the court yard for our meal. The single story wing is a treasure trove of second hand books

What a great find this place is, almost  like an old-fashioned English pub. At the other side of the court-yard we discovered a room filled with antiques and bric-a-brac. A quick look in the ballroom before our meal arrived.

After a relaxed and tasty meal of Atlantic salmon with salad we were ready to move on but as we paid our bill and chatted to the land lord he told us

“you must look at the river it actually has some water in it”

Every one is urging us to admire their river. So it seemed fitting that our day started with exploring the river and now should end with one last look.

The walk down to the river's edge

The walk down to the river’s edge

It had been a perfect day, the sun was shining and the temperature was a comfortable 25degrees. This is a day trip back in time and I still have one more place to visit the historic Greenough heritage village. But that will have to wait for another day.

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I have joined Jo’s cyber walk-about group. Each week Jo invites us to take a walk in our areas and show the group where we have been. Jo is walking in Poland go here to walk with her.

 

 

Categories: Australia, Greenough, Jo's Monday walks, photos, travel, Western Australia | Tags: , , , | 28 Comments

Lingering Look Through a Window into the Past

looking through to a by-gone era.

looking through to a by-gone era.

 

Museums are marvellous places, they take us back to times gone-by and show us how it used to be. The big city museums are usually rooms with different collections of all things. But I love discovering the small country museums lovingly put together and researched by the local community. Quite often they are in a heritage building that has been thoughtfully restored.

When we turned into the drive to “Home Cottage” it was like going back to the 19th century. The home  built  by John Maley in 1860 for his new bride Elizabeth Waldeck as a small 4 room cottage, soon had to be extended as the family grew to 14 children. As the most impressive building in the area and John being a successful business man, known by all as “King of Greenough Flats”,  it soon became the social centre for the community of Greenough.

Home Cottage built 1862 with the help of convict labour.

Home Cottage built 1862 with the help of convict labour.

For me the true heroine of this story is Elizabeth, his wife.

An amazing woman

An amazing woman

Cast your mind back to this era, no modern conveniences, no supermarket, Perth, the nearest city almost 500 kilometres away and transport to get there was horse and cart.

Can you imagine how Elizabeth coped? 14 children, constant visitors calling in, a huge house to maintain and a garden to look after. She did have one maid servant, but reading Elizabeth’s diary (on display in the museum), the maid was quite lazy and uncooperative. No doubt the children had to do their share of the chores. Often John had to be away to look after other business concerns and Elizabeth would be left for days on her own and in those times, as well as usual chores, there was the added burden of running the flour mill that was on the property.

A botanist friend would visit regularly and he planted the beautiful pepper trees dotted around the property and giving much-needed shade. So come with me into the world of Elizabeth and John circa 1800’s.

The large, mature pepper trees provide much needed shade for the back of the house.

The large, mature pepper trees provide much needed shade for the back of the house.

Enter through the small door and suddenly you are in a world were every thing you do is hard work. To provide a meal means first of all growing the vegetables, killing and curing the sheep, beast or chicken, baking the bread, which is an all day task, chopping the wood for the wood-burner stove. Hopefully there has been enough rain to fill the tanks, but it will need heating for washing duties.

Wood-burner stove with the bread oven alongside

Wood-burner stove with the bread oven alongside

A table with a history

A table with a history

Information about the table

Interesting information about the table

What resourceful people the pioneers were, and what a beautifully crafted table this is. A table this large would be needed for the family. I can imagine the happy times shared around this table, the laughter and chatter at meal times.

Times were hard but in a small tight-knit community they would make their own entertainment. There would always be a friend or neighbour to help.

Old style irons

Old style irons

Ironing was another essential chore, non-iron fabrics were not invented and cottons, calico and wool needed washing and then ironing.

The iron bark clothesline

The iron bark clothesline

 

Essential sewing machine, all clothes had to be hand made

Essential sewing machine, all clothes had to be hand made

Finally the days chores would be finished and time to go to bed.

Be careful these stairs are very narrow and steep.

Be careful these stairs are very narrow and steep.

The old wire mesh bed-stead

The old wire mesh bed-stead

I remember my Mother had one of these bed bases with an old horse hair mattress. It made a great trampoline for a 5 year old girl, but it was very saggy to sleep on.

The children's beds

The children’s beds, the quilts would be hand made too. When would they find the time?

Time to get up as the morning sun shines in the window

Time to get up as the morning sun shines in the window

Look out to see what the weather will be. No radio to tell you what to expect

Look out to see what the weather will be. No radio to tell you what to expect

In 1888 disaster struck this area. It was a Sunday in February, a normal mid-summer day, the sun beat down and the heat was oppressive. Unbeknown to this community a huge deluge of rain fell in the mountains a long way up north. Within hours the Greenough river was a roaring torrent With no communication systems to warn them, the first indication of danger was the roar of the river. Imagine the horror as the Greenough Flats became a huge lake 48 kilometres long and 5 metres deep in parts. 4 people drowned and houses, crops and stock were destroyed.

Home Cottage and the flour mill were not affected. Elizabeth provided shelter and food to many of the homeless families. The photos and accounts of this disaster were heart breaking to read about.

John Maley’s biggest losses came about by the many farmers that owed him money not being able to repay their debts after the flood had wiped them out. Many families moved away after the flood, some going to the gold fields, others starting up in other agricultural areas. John had to sell off many of his business ventures.

Finally a walk down the garden path took us to the “Dunny”, no plumbing and inside loos back then. But this is no ordinary Dunny.

Now would you want to share???

Now would you want to share???

Notice the newspaper hanging on the peg on the wall?

I can still remember in the 1940’s, as a child in England, using the newspaper for toilet paper. We did not have an outside dunny, but times were hard after the war. 

The museum was established in 1966 by the Geraldton Historical Society then purchased by the local council in 1971. It is now managed by the Community Group of Greenough. Part of the house is still occupied by a manager, and as we left he called out to us

“Take a walk down to the river, it’s not often we see it with water running in it”

Take care, we could hear the roaring as we approached.

Take care, we could hear the roaring as we approached.

You can see part of the road is washed away

You can see part of the road is washed away

 

This was only caused by quite a minor rainfall that we have had over the past 10 days. I can only imagine what it was like in 1888.

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Dawn from her blog “The Day After”  encourages us to look for interesting windows and link them to her challenge “Lingering Look at Windows”. So this week I am showing you a few windows I found at the museum.

 

Categories: Australia, floods, floods, Greenough, Lingering look at windows, museum, photos, Western Australia | Tags: , , , , , | 31 Comments

A Walk in a Heritage Garden

The farmer’s prayers were answered. After a week of very welcome showers turning into heavy rain, waking up to grey skies each morning, it finally changed. Sunday and “Mother’s Day” dawned with clear blue skies.

Time to explore.

25 kilometres south of Geraldton is the heritage hamlet of Greenough. Situated on the fertile flood plains and near the mouth of the Greenough River, close to the ocean. During the 1860’s it became a thriving agricultural area. Initially farming was easy but primitive agricultural techniques, lack of fertilizing and the scourge of rust disease on the wheat crops, combined with droughts, fires and floods led to the area’s decline. Settlers moved out and the fine buildings fell into disrepair.

Fortunately the cultural and heritage value was recognized in the 1970’s and a dedicated group of people have made the enormous effort to save some of these beautiful buildings. Today it is a pleasure to wander around and admire a by-gone age.

First stop was the impressive “Home Cottage” now a museum.

Home Cottage built 1862 with the help of convict labour.

Home Cottage built 1862 with the help of convict labour.

In preparation for his wedding John Maley built this house for his new bride. Originally a 4 room cottage it was extended as the family fortune grew along with the number of children. Elizabeth had 14 children.

The house is now a museum. The exhibits, photos and stories take you back to an era when life was hard, no modern appliances. But family and friends shared a strong bond of helping and caring. I will take you through the house in the next post as this time I want to walk you through the garden.

What a pleasure it was, so much love and care has been put into this garden to show you how it used to be.

The large, mature pepper trees provide much needed shade for the back of the house.

The large, mature pepper trees provide much-needed shade for the back of the house, and a seat is handy to take a rest.

 

Along the side path towards the veg garden

Along the side path towards the veg garden

 

Another seat under another pepper tree.

Another seat under another pepper tree.

 

Welcome to Elizabeth's garden.

Welcome to Elizabeth’s garden.

 

Open the gate and in we go to the veggie patch.

Open the gate and in we go to the veggie patch.

 

What a good idea

What a good idea

 

Now this is an idea I am going to take home with me. Can you see how it works? The barrel is filled with compost and horse manure, holes cut in the sides and plastic pipes put in to plant the seedlings in. Great for herbs when stood in full sun, and very easy to water and care for.

The scarecrow

The scarecrow

Of course any serious veggie patch must have a scarecrow. Oops this fellow needs his pants pulling up.

Maybe Jack will pull them up...

Maybe Jack will pull them up…

That rosemary smelt divine and helps keep pests away. Notice the stakes used as supports for vines and the stones used to create raised garden beds.

Love the rustic look.

Love the rustic look.

Recycling at it's best

Recycling at it’s best

The hanging baskets of strawberries have a good place to hang and keep away from pests.

This is a community garden.

This is now a community garden.

The shade house in the background was used for seedlings and propagating cuttings. In another corner they had a compost heap. Nothing was wasted. It has been a very hot, dry summer but now the autumn rains have arrived the garden is starting to come back to life. Lots of new seedlings coming along.

The iron bark clothesline

The iron bark clothesline

Do you remember these old style clothes line? My Mother had one in the back garden in England in the days before rotary clothes-lines (Hill’s Hoists in Australia) and clothes drying machines.

Next post I will show you some of the interesting things I found inside the house.

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I have joined Jo’s cyber walk-about group. Each week Jo invites us to take a walk in our areas and show the group where we have been.

Jo has been in Poland and this week she has taken us for a walk in the country side of this interesting country. Click here to join her.

Categories: Australia, Greenough, Jo's Monday walks, photos, Western Australia | Tags: , , , , | 25 Comments

WordPress Photo Challenge : Monument

This may not be a monument in the same category as the Taj Mahal or Eiffel Tower but it is a monument to the power of the wind and how nature can adapt and still survive.

A classic example of going with the flow.

Windswept trees of the Greenhough Plains

Windswept trees of the Greenough Plains

The information about the trees

The information about the trees

We noticed these trees as we drove to Geraldton. Greenough is only 20 minutes south of Geraldton and is a small historic settlement, so we will be coming back to explore this area after we have settled into our new home. 

In the meantime I would like to present these trees as my interpretation of this weeks WP Photo challenge

  

Categories: Australia, Greenough, Leaning trees, monument, photos, post-a-week, travel, Weekly photo challenge, Western Australia | Tags: , , , , , , , | 52 Comments

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