New South Wales

Singing Plants at Crystal Castle…

I visited the Crystal Castle 17 days ago and I am still trying to interpret what I saw and what my feelings are.

I chose to visit on a Wednesday as the programme for the day included listening to the “music of the plants”. Described as a profoundly moving and memorable experience. One of my passions is gardening. I love the beauty of plants and of course I believe they are responsive and have connections and vibrations that we cannot actually see. So I was looking forward to hearing them sing…

The plant concert was due to start at 1-30 next to the Blessing Buddha.

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This Buddha is very special to the formation of the Buddha Walk experience. It was in the year 2000 that Naren and wife Sono decided to create the Buddha Walk and in 2004 the search began for all the statues.

Finding Buddha was quite elusive until they heard about a master carver in Java, it was here that this huge, almost 4 metres tall, Buddha was hand carved from volcanic rock from a mountain in Java, then shipped to Australia.

It took another 18 months to create the gardens and transform an old dam site into a fitting setting for Buddha were he sits, giving forth a feeling of peace and tranquillity.

So it was here that I sat, in an open sided marquee, to listen to the story and history behind the phenomena of the singing plants.

It was explained that the idea and research about the music plants made, had first been researched at “Damanhur”. A connection was made with the people at Damanhur and a small box was acquired from them. Now this is were I, sort of, lost all the technology explanations. But a wire with a rusty sort of nail was pushed into the soil around the plants roots, another wire with a bulldog clip was attached to the leaves of the plant and a third wire went into the small box which was then connected to a synthesiser. Ok are you following this… I am now kicking myself as unfortunately I did not take photos. This link will explain it better than I can. http://in5d.com/amazing-singing-plants-phenomenon/

There was an expectant hush as we all sat waiting. Nothing happened.

We were told that the plants could not just sing on cue, sometimes they did not feel in the mood. So the clip was taken from that plant and moved to another. We were asked to meditate and chant the word “Ohm” Suddenly small noises, squeaks, uncoördinated notes emitted from the box.

I made a short video. Against the back ground of the “Ohm” chant you will be able to hear the synthesised sounds.

So what do you think? Is it the plants? Or is it a rather elaborate hoax…

Here is another version of “Damanhur” from a person who experienced living there and now warns anyone planning to go to be careful. https://damanhurinsideout.wordpress.com/

After an hour we went back to the main building to look at the amazing displays of crystals in the shop.

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The Crystal Castle is a truly unique place and on every level it exudes spirituality. The Stupor, the crystals placed everywhere, the spiral design of the gardens, the lush tropical plants used, the magnificent statues, the distant vista of the Border Ranges and rainforest covered slopes, the organic veggie garden. Then the inspiring story of one man and his dream and how he slowly, over 3 decades, turned that dream into reality.

I can appreciate the beauty, hard work and dedication.

But I am a practical, down to earth sort of person. I do not dwell on religion, spirituality, the meaning of life. My focus is on the “now”, the daily necessities of life, the people around me, my garden. So the connection Crystal Castle has with Damanhur and the singing plants left a vague uncomfortable niggle at the back of my mind.

Would I go back again? Most definitely.

For more details of the daily programme, how to get there follow this link.

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In the “weekly photo challenge” Krista asks us to show her our idea of a “Happy Place”.

If you think of “happy” as being serene and contented this Crystal Castle ticks the box for me…

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Categories: Australia, Crystal Castle, happy, New South Wales, photos, Weekly photo challenge | Tags: , , , , | 34 Comments

The magic of a dream come true

 This story starts in 1985. Naren King was invited to a New Years Eve party at the home of Mal Cooper who had employed  Edwin Kingsbury an eccentric architect to design a unique and magnificent building. The building was positioned right on the point where the earths energy lines, or ley lines intersect. It was a magical place, radiating harmony and peace and Naren fell in love with it.  When the Mal Cooper went broke due to only demanding the very best materials for his “harmonious architecture” it became a dream and an obsession for Naren to own it.

After a number of set backs the property became his and he and his wife began a life long project of creating a place of magic. Naren was Australia’s first direct importer of quality natural crystals from around the world and this was to be the ideal place for him to showcase their beauty.

In 1986 the land had been cleared for grazing and banana growing so now the work began to transform it into a garden, a tropical wonderland.

Jump forward to 2015 and we are house sitting only a 30 minute car ride from this extraordinary place so of course we had to visit it.

But where do I start to show you the captivating, overwhelming beauty of the gardens with magnificent statues of the deities at every corner. The tranquil Buddha and the magnificent stupor that was blessed by the Dalai Lama.

I will start as we walk in and follow the track to the Stupor…

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A rustic path meanders through the beds densely planted with tropical vegetation. Prayer flags are waving in a slight breeze as we round the corner.

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The first of the many serene statues  we are to see, stands guard over the large koi fish.

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Passing the Tibetan prayer wheels the path leads down to the Stupor.

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Beautiful eastern music floats through the air surrounding me as I recorded this short video as I sit and watch all ages walk reverently around this symbol of peace.

Crystals were Naren’s passion and they are to be found all round the gardens. A short way past the Stupor “Rosie”, a 4 tonne mini-mountain of rose quartz is one of the largest ever found in the world with such a large “crystalized face”.

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I spent quite a while in this area absorbing the feeling of calm and beauty that pervaded the atmosphere.

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Going back past the other side of the pond the track now winds through the tropical gardens back to the house that Narin fell in love with.

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After wandering through the Botanical Shambhala Gardens admiring the variety of sub-tropical and tropical plants we spotted the café through a screen of red kangaroo paws. But first we looked around the courtyard outside the café. This is where we saw this amazing trompe l’oeil.

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This extraordinary water feature dominates the courtyard. Using rose quartz it was crafted by highly skilled fountain makers from Germany. The base is granite from Switzerland. The 310 kilogram sphere rotates on a mere 0.3 millimetres of water. It glows as it catches the sun and according to mystic lore, rose quartz emanates the qualities of love and compassion and this is the spinning heart of the Crystal Castle.

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There is so much to see in this courtyard. The ground is embedded with 20,000 pieces of rose quartz

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This seat is made from Sodalite’ this is what I found about it on the internet.

“Sodalite is the stone of athletics, as it stimulates endurance. It is said sodalite will harmonize the inner being or the conscious and subconscious mind. Sodalite promotes peace and harmony. Sodalite is extra lucky for writers.” (I sat there for a while!)

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Magnificent clusters of crystals were everywhere, sparkling and glistening giving off so much energy. Almost overwhelming.

Time for lunch.

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We were there during school holiday time so it was busy. But the service was friendly and quick and the food delicious. Most of the salads and vegetables are grown in their own organic vegie garden.

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This was an Indian Plate and delicious. But look what we followed it with…

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As we waited for lunch we had a lovely view down into the gardens, and across to the distant Border Ranges.

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There is still more to see but for now I will leave you as we eat our lunch and take you on the Buddha walk in the next episode.

Going through to the Buddha Walk...

Going through to the Buddha Walk…

(To be continued)

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I’m joining with Restless Jo’s cyber walking group this week. Bloggers sharing walks all over the world.

 

Categories: Crystal Castle, Jo's Monday walks, New South Wales, photos, travel | Tags: , , , , | 32 Comments

Market Day at Mullumbimby.

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The third Saturday of each month is market day in Mullumbimby. Called Mullum by the locals. It has been the centre for alternative or counter-culture since the 1970’s and to wander around town and visit the markets it is like stepping back into that era, the time of the flower children, communal living and the hippies still survives in this vibrant and colourful “biggest, little town in Australia”.

 

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These 2 had come down in their camper van, from Brisbane, the big smoke, to spend the weekend here. Picking a handful of flowers from the hedgerow to put in her hair she is a new age flower child.

It was interesting to look at the houses and gardens as we walked along to the markets.

Definitely my style of place. Small, rustic, lots of picket fences, some overgrown and wild, others neat and cottagey. Loved to see the swing hanging from the tree in the middle of the street for all children to play on.

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Before we even arrived at the markets we passed locals that had spread their wares out behind their vehicles. Is there anything there you would like Jack?

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As we entered the market we could feel the love, so many greeting each other with hugs, the atmosphere was happy and care-free, and a great place for people watching.

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Grey flowing locks and bare feet, long skirts, caftans and happy pants were the predominant fashion. The young woman in the modern “jeggings” looks to be from another world.

The market is in the Historical Park and an old cedar shed looks its age next to the 50+ market stalls.

Weaving being demonstrated

Weaving being demonstrated

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Do you remember macramé? A craft from the 70’s. Well this stall was full of it and I thought this is an example of a “grid” created with string, (the weekly photo challenge)

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Look how tall this bloke is!!!

There were plenty of food and coffee  stalls all under the large shady trees, but it was an overcast sort of day with showers threatening, so we decided to walk back to the main street for lunch.

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One last channelling of the 70’s as we passed this old truck devoted to shiatsu massage. But he is all modern age with his phone in hand.  Incidentally I did not see too many people on their phones…

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As we passed these two friendly characters Jack had to stop for a chat. Bushy and the Pirate were very laid back and a distinct aroma of the 70’s floated on the air around them. Back in the day, this town grew weed so potent it was known as Mullum Madness!

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This was originally the Bank of New South Wales but now houses a very comprehensive collection of organic produce and supplies. Mullum is the service town for the area and has a good range of shops and services. Lots of craft shops to wander around. But we were looking for lunch. I had checked on “Trip Advisor” before I left home and from 21 choices they named “Rock & Roll Coffee Company” as number one. It is tucked away down a little lane in the heart of town, just round the corner from the organic emporium.

But just a minute, we could hear music, a jazz  blues band. This we had to check out.

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This group of local musicians were belting out “Mustang Sally”. Lunch forgotten we stayed, along with quite a crowd, to listen. Finally we dropped a donation in the guitar case and left with a smile on our faces to find lunch.

So down the lane we went. Most of the diners looked like locals and it was a small, sort of hole in the wall type of place. But the food was delicious, (I forgot to take a photo!).

Did you notice the entrance to the left of the café?

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Must have a look in here…

Lots of good quality arts and crafts and a relaxing courtyard with that amazing mural on the back wall.

Feeling refreshed, fuelled and caffeinated we went for a walk around the streets. But time to head back home…

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I don’t think the cats even missed us… 

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I will join in with Restless Jo’s intrepid walkers this week. Come over and join them.

Categories: Australia, grid, Jo's Monday walks, markets, Mullumbimby, New South Wales, travel, Weekly photo challenge | Tags: , , , , , , | 45 Comments

The Natural Wonderland of the Scenic Rim

Do you like shopping, casinos the glitz and glamour of the Gold Coast? If so I will leave you with the Icons of the Gold Coast.  https://pommepal.wordpress.com/2015/08/03/gold-coast-icons/

But if you love the beauty of nature, rainforests, rivers and stunning scenery, come with me today. I am going south, over the border into New South Wales.

Millions of years ago this was an area of volcanic activity. The ground shook and volcanoes spewed forth the molten lava from the bowels of the earth. Mountains were formed and rivers of lava flowed through the valleys leaving behind a layer of rich volcanic ash. The earth cooled and rivers flowed were once the lava created the valleys. Mighty rainforest trees thrived in this rich soil and vines and creepers twisted and tangled into every spare gap. It was a land of abundance. For thousands of years the Aborigine Bundjalung people cherished this land, it gave them all they needed for survival. Their name for the mountain is “Wollumbin”; meaning, “cloud-catcher”. 

 Captain Cook passed by in 1770 and called this mighty mountain “Mt Warning”. A mere 200 years ago pioneers (and convicts) arrived looking for a better place. In awe they looked at this land of abundance and settled here. The mighty Red Cedar trees were cut down and used to build their houses, make furniture and send overseas to an insatiable market. The land was cleared to plant crops and create farms. Slowly the mighty rainforests were raped and plundered and the Aborigines were denied access to their ancestral home land.

Fortunately the park was reserved for public recreation in 1928 and dedicated as a national park in 1966. The Park is part of the Shield Volcano Group of the World Heritage Site Gondwana Rainforests of Australia inscribed in 1986 and added to the Australian National Heritage List in 2007.

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Now the mighty “Wollumbin” slumbers on the horizon. Its work has been done. At times shrouded in mist.

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At the foot of the range the Tweed River winds through the fertile farm land.

Today I will take you to Tumbulgum, a small historic village nestled on the banks of the Tweed River.

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Looking across to Wollumbin/Mt Warning from the junction of the Tweed and Rous Rivers, Tumbulgum was one of the first villages established in northern NSW in around 1840. For many years, it was the Tweed Valley’s main hub of activity, with shops and services springing up to cater to the timber trade and cedar cutters. At one stage it vied with nearby Murwillumbah for commercial supremacy – until Murwillumbah scored the railway in 1897 and a bridge in 1901, guaranteeing its status as the Tweed Valley’s economic centre. In Tumbulgum today it is the tourists who generate the buzz, coming to enjoy the picturesque setting and admire the historic buildings which now house a range of art galleries, gift shops and cafés. murwillumbah-4 One of the most popular reminders of the past is undoubtedly the old Tumbulgum Tavern. Established in 1887, it was the region’s first unlicensed pub (otherwise known as a ‘grog shanty’) and over 120 years later, it is still going strong. The food here is excellent – as are the sunsets that illuminate the river and Wollumbin/Mt Warning. It is too early for lunch. I think I will make a note to come here for dinner one evening. A boat cruises from nearby Tweed along the river and after dinner will take you back again.

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As we drive away this interesting old tree calls to my camera. As we reach Murwillumbah another old tree “talks” to me.

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Jack has an interesting post about the museum and art gallery in Murwillumbah. Go to this link.  https://jacksjottings.wordpress.com/2015/08/03/tranquil-trip/

To see more artists impressions of this beautiful area this is the link to the art gallery http://calderaart.org.au/

Now it is lunchtime and we drive out-of-town and toward the Mt Warning Road. To the Rainforest Café that has been recommended by the lady in the tourist information centre.

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We are not disappointed it is set in an idyllic setting on the banks of a small meandering creek. The tables are well spread out and you can choose to sit in the sun or the shade from the large, mature trees and palms. We choose to sit on the veranda. Can you see Jack?

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The food is delicious.

There is so much to see in this area. Next time I will take you for a walk in the rainforest.

Categories: aboriginal history, Australia, New South Wales, Tumbulgum, Wollumbin/Mt Warning | Tags: , , , , | 50 Comments

A walk to the Giants Causeway…

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Well I am not in Ireland but walking in the delightful small village and area of Fingal Heads.

When it comes to odd facts, they don’t come much odder than the fact that this charming Tweed village was named after the mythical Celtic giant Fingal who reportedly built the famous Giant’s Causeway in Ireland.

The connection is that Tweed’s Fingal Head has its own Giant’s Causeway – a crescent-shaped mass of hexagonal columns formed when the lava flows from the ancient Tweed Volcano rapidly cooled in the ocean currents. This unique rock formation sits just below Fingal Lighthouse on the headland, reaching towards Cook Island.

This is my first outing in “The Car”. Though Fingal Head is only a 25 minute drive from home this is the first time I have been to explore it.

A sign pointing along a sandy track to the intriguingly named “Dreamtime Beach” entices me to follow it.

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I can hear squeals and shrieks as I approach the end of the track.

4 bikini clad girls are frolicking in the surf. Now I must remind you that it is winter but the temperature is approximately 22C and obviously these girls do not think it is winter.

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These two are exploring around the base of the rocks as I pass by and find another sandy track taking me round to the headland.

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A bench is conveniently placed to rest awhile before following the steps up to the top of the headland.

The lighthouse is having a renovation. But look at how bright that blue sky is in contrast to the fresh white coat of paint.

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From this headland there are glorious views of the ocean and along the beach. Being Saturday and such a perfect day I pass many other people also enjoying a day out.

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Perfect picnic weather. I follow along the path. Gulls are swooping and gliding in the air currents. I stand for a while trying to catch a gull in flight. But it is impossible every photo is blurred.

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As I round the corner I am amazed to peer over the edge and see this man fishing. The ocean is swelling and breaking in a frenzy of foam, threatening to sweep him off the precarious rock he is balanced on.

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This is the Giants Causeway. The might of the ocean is crashing onto the rocks then sweeping through the narrow causeway. The sound and fury of the waves is awesome and this is a fine day, I wonder how it would be in a storm.

Fingal Head boasts some of the most spectacular examples of columnar jointing to be found in the whole of NSW. The local indigenous Goodjingburra clan’s name for Fingal Head is Booninybah – Home of the Giant Echidna: “Booniny” means Giant Echidna. The spectacular columns of Fingal Head resemble the spines of an echidna, and so the Goodjingburra believe that the spirit of the echidna inhabits the headland.

I sit on a rock for quite a while watching the ebb and flow of the waves and waiting to see if the fisher man will get swept off his rock. I have heard that rock fishing is classed as one of the most dangerous sports and a number of people are swept to their death every year. (While overall coastal drowning figures for NSW are significantly down from last year, for the first time rock fishing deaths have topped the list at 26.7%, making it the leading cause of all coastal drownings.)

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This is looking north along Fingal Beach and I follow the track back through the bush.

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From this beach I look back and see the fisher man is still on his rock.

It is lunch time and after seeing a number of families enjoying picnic lunches it was time to go back to the car for my lunch.

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I smile as I follow along behind this couple walking hand in hand. They soon disappear as I stop to listen to the birds. Then I spot a couple of bush turkeys and stalk them trying to get a photo, but I’m having no luck with the bird photos today. So I take photos of some native flowers I see.

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I have no idea what these flowers are. They look like red bluebells!

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A park is on the other side of the red flowers BUT it is not the park I left “The Car” at. There are so many tracks going in all directions through the bush and I have not been taking any notice of the direction I was heading.

I am lost…

Fortunately it is not a large bush area. So I backtrack along the beach and eventually find where I came in. Phew, there is “The car”…

I decide to go back, in “The car” to the park of the red flowers as I had noticed picnic tables.

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I packed a picnic lunch as I was not sure if I would find any where to eat in Fingal. It was pleasant, an ibis joined me.

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And I was entertained by a mother and her 2 children as they examined an interesting wooden sculpture. Then played hide and seek. The little girl “hid” under a picnic table in full view, but Mum searched around for her and there was shrieks of laughter when she was “found”.

 The Tweed River flowed along the other side of the park so after lunch I wandered over.

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At last I caught some seagulls as they scattered before me.

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This looks a much safer way to fish.

Almost time to head home, it has been a great day. Then I hear singing and a guitar playing.

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I had to investigate. What an interesting place and live music too. The Sheoak Shack, this groovy café is located on the banks of the river, under the shade of a Sheoak Tree.

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It was so laid back and a small table in the sun called to me. So I ordered cappuccino and carrot cake and listened to Guy Kachel serenading us.

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This was the most delicious, moist carrot cake to end my day out with…

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I would like you to come along with me on Jo’s Monday walks. She has a dedicated group of cyber walkers who share their wanderings with us each week. Go here to join them.

Categories: Australia, Fingal Head, Jo's Monday walks, New South Wales, Ocean, photos | Tags: , , , , | 50 Comments

A journey into the dawn of time.

 

Where we are staying for this house sit, along the mid-north coast of NSW, the mountain scenery  is a spectacular backdrop to the pristine beaches along the coast. National Parks abound in this area. One in particular we have been told about is Dorrigo National Park along the “Waterfall Way”. The name alone tempts me to explore. So today with the sun shining we head inland.

It is a 65 kilometre drive from Nambucca Heads to Dorrigo and the road is a marvel of the grit and determination of the early road builders. It climbs and winds through narrow gorges cut from solid rock. In places the tight turns curl back on themselves. Then it will narrow to a one way cutting. It feels like driving a rally course and needs intense concentration. The spectacular scenery spreads away to the horizon.

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As I squeeze past the oncoming traffic I catch a glimpse of this waterfall mistily cascading down the cliff face, we pull over to take a photo.

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The rainforest towers above us.

It is lunchtime when we pull into Dorrigo the small timber settlement on the edge of the National Park.

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This grand old hotel built in 1925 by Michael Feros, is heritage listed and is still owned by the Feros family. It is a classic example of Australian hotel architecture of the 1920s. The meals had been recommended and they were good, but HUGE. After seeing the size of other diners meals, we ordered one seafood platter to share. 4 Large calamari that just melted in the mouth, 4 super size prawns, 4 pieces of fish a heap of chips and a delicious fresh salad, that was supposed to be a meal for one! Needless to say we enjoyed it…

Next it was a short 2 kilometre detour along the road to the Dangar Falls.

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It was a pleasant surprise to see so much water cascading over the escarpment as there has been no rain for weeks.

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  This fertile area was once covered in forest and the giant red cedar was the king, but the timber industry of the late 1800’s and early 1900’s soon cleaned out this precious timber.

Word quickly spread of the agricultural potential of the area’s deep basalt Soils, and with Government regulations requiring selectors to improve the value of their land, farmers immediately set to work to clear the scrub for pasture.

Rainforest clearing was backbreaking work. Trees were ringbarked or felled, and burnt in ‘great conflagrations’.

 “During the last twelve months it is estimated that fully 3,000 acres of timber have been committed to the flames so that at the present rate it will not be very long before the entire original scrub has disappeared.” (Agricultural Gazette, 1911).

The 1917 Guide to the Dorrigo Shire extolled the plateau as “an enormous area of splendid, delightfully, watered agricultural and dairying lands, upon which are many smiling homesteads and herds of well-bred cattle and adds “notwithstanding wanton destruction of enormous areas of timber, magnificent supplies yet remain for posterity”.

However, the luxuriance of the rainforest growth exaggerated the fertility of the underlying soils. Most of the valuable plant nutrients were derived from the rich and constantly recycled litter layer of the forest floor, and after forest clearing and subsequent burning,these nutrients were quickly depleted.

It was a hard life for early settlers, with distant markets and decreasing soil fertility offering poor returns. However, many were successful and dairying, beef cattle and logging are still major industries of Dorrigo today.”  (information from the Dorrigo community web site)

Leaving the fertile farmlands behind we drove on to the Rainforest centre.

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This word brings to me the vision of an ancient land, with dinosaurs roaming through the rainforest. But this is the twenty-first century and fortunately remnants of these prehistoric rainforests have been preserved as National Parks.

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This 75 metre long “Skywalk” takes you over the rainforest canopy to magnificent views to the distant mountains and on a clear day as far as the ocean.

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After seeing life from a bird’s eye view it is now time to go down to ground level.

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Another board walk takes us down into the bowels of the rainforest.

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As we walk through this heritage listed park the track winds through the luxuriant tropical vegetation. Trees, with large buttress roots,  tower above us, palms fight for space as thick woody vines encircle every thing. Epiphytes and ferns are also common and add a profusion of multi-layered confusion.

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This describes the atmosphere so well. Much better words than I could ever think of to describe how it feels, with the rustle of the wind and the abundant call of birds and, surprisingly, no one else on the track, it felt as though we had been transported back to the start of time.

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There is so much more to see in this spectacular area and I make a mental note that we will come back again and follow this “Water Fall Way” right along its 165 kilometre length from the ocean at Coffs Harbour to Armidale on the New England tablelands.

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This is my contribution to “Jo’s Monday Walk”.

Categories: Australia, Dorrigo National Park, Jo's Monday walks, National Parks, New South Wales, photos, travel | Tags: , , , , , | 72 Comments

Goulburn, Rich in Heritage and History.

Goulburn surprised me with its old fashioned, well-preserved heritage buildings. I felt I was walking back into the history of the Victorian era. Compared to the modern Canberra it felt rural and a very livable city. The camera went into over-drive and I took well over 200 photos.

After the interesting stop in Collector it was lunchtime as we pulled into the Visitors Centre to collect maps and information, so first priority was to refuel the inner man and woman…

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This was the first café we came to and looking inside it was busy, always a good sign. So in we went.

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Just look at the selection, it made my mouth water...

Just look at the selection, it made my mouth water…

This is the sweets selection and it is so attractive.

This is the sweets selection and it is so attractive.

This is our choice quiche for me, mini shepherds pie for Jack, Look at that fresh salad.

This is our choice quiche for me, mini shepherds pie for Jack, Look at that fresh salad.

With energy levels restored and with map in hand we explore. Just across the road from the café is Belmore Park with a fine example of a Victorian fountain and Band Rotunda.

The beds were planted with the sweet pansies and spring was in the air. Turning the corner into Auburn Street was like stepping back 100 years. I expected to see horses and carts trundle by.

 

Turning another corner another world opens up, the cute cottages and villas from the early 1900’s. Well maintained and loved.

Goulburn was the first inland city and I found this information in Wikipedia.

Goulburn holds the unique distinction of being proclaimed a City on two occasions. The first, unofficial, proclamation was claimed by virtue of Royal Letters Patent issued by Queen Victoria on 14 March 1863 to establish the Diocese of Goulburn. It was a claim made for ecclesiastical purposes, as it was required by the traditions of the Church of England. The Letters Patent also established St Saviour’s Church as the Cathedral Church of the diocese. This was the last instance in which Letters Patent were used in this manner in the British Empire, as they had been significantly discredited for use in the colonies, and were soon to be declared formally invalid and unenforceable in this context.[4] Several legal cases[5] over the preceding decade in particular had already established that the monarch had no ecclesiastical jurisdiction in colonies possessing responsible government. This had been granted to NSW in 1856, seven years earlier. The Letters Patent held authority only over those who submitted to it voluntarily, and then only within the context of the Church – it had no legal civil authority or implications. An absolute and retrospective declaration to this effect was made in 1865 in the Colenso Case,[4] by the Judiciary Committee of the Privy Council. However, under the authority of the Crown Lands Act 1884[6] (48. Vict. No. 18), Goulburn was officially proclaimed a City on 20 March 1885[7] removing any lingering doubts as to its status. This often unrecognised controversy has in no way hindered the development of Goulburn as a regional centre, with an impressive court house (completed in 1887) and other public buildings, as a centre for wool selling, and as an industrial town.

The Cathedral is an impressive sandstone building. The splendid bell-tower, soaring windows and massive stone work are the first impressions one has of St Saviour’s. Named after the Saviour himself, Jesus Christ, the Cathedral dominates Bourke Street and the streetscape of Montague Street. 

Goulburn pc 187_2935x1949

St Saviour’s Cathedral expresses the grace, care and forethought of  one of Australia’s most famous architects, Edmund T. Blacket,  a great architect at the height of his powers. It gains the effect of spaciousness without being very big, and of splendour without being over-ornate. 

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Many of the galleries and craft shops are only open on the weekend so we are going back tomorrow for another day in Goulburn…

(to be continued)

Categories: Australia, Goulburn, New South Wales, New South Wales, photos | Tags: , , , , | 6 Comments

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