Out and About Budget Style

Another perfect day, the sun was shining the air was crisp and clear. I felt like exploring, but with no car the alternative was to use the local buses.

So armed with information from the Metro Shop, timetables and of course my camera I sallied forth.

Seven Mile Beach sounds interesting. It is a half hour drive, out through the suburbs and into the country. I am the only passenger on the bus and enjoy the front seat view and chatting to the driver/chauffeur. As a child he lived in this area and told me some interesting details.

The bus would be back in an hour, excellent time for a walk along the beach.

7 Mile Beach

7 Mile Beach

 

Beautiful reflections

Beautiful reflections

Ripples in the sand

Ripples in the sand

It was a beautiful beach to walk along and I found some interesting shells. Notice how dry the hills look. Tasmania is the second driest capital city and at the moment they need rain, but I am pleased it isn’t raining today.

At the end of the beach is an all in one shop/take away/ garage and I stopped for a coffee. Sitting in the sun I watched the locals walking by with their dogs.

Then it was back to Hobart.

Next place I planned to find was Risdon Cove.

This is the historical site of the first landing of Europeans in Tasmania in 1803. It was quite difficult to find out any details about it. Being so important to the settling of Australia I was expecting to find interesting artefacts, monuments and information boards.

I had 45 minutes before the bus left, time for another coffee and a muffin.

This bus was full, I was surprised. Not really sure where the destination was I thought I would stay on till I either saw a monument or arrived at the end of the bus route, assuming a cove would be a dead-end.

Wrong….

When every one else had got off the bus I asked the driver about Risdon Cove.

“Oh I don’t actually go right past, but I can put you off at the round-about and you can walk approximately a kilometre to the site. It’s owned by the Aboriginals now” he said.

Well he put me off at the round-about which was in the middle of no-where and pointed out which road to walk along. I had to hurry to get across 2 lanes of heavy traffic and walked along the side of the road wondering what the drivers rushing by in their insulated world on wheels would make of this old lady wandering along. No one stopped to ask.

The road wound around a valley with bush clad slopes on either side. I couldn’t see very far ahead. Should I keep going or turn back? Would I see anything when I got there? I almost gave up, then I spotted a sign with a very prominent Aboriginal flag displayed. YES, I had arrived, but arrived at what? A building with children at play, another building that looked like a meeting hall. No sign of a museum and information centre I had read about in an old Lonely Planet book. Then I noticed the signs, they all told of the Aboriginal side of the “invasion” of the white man. There is two sides to every story and the Aboriginals were massacred in Tasmania and deserve recognition. But also the settlers should have acknowledgment at such a historical site.

I followed the track past a beautiful stream, the herons and ducks stalked the fish and the reflections created a tranquil atmosphere. Over a bridge. the monument to John Bowen who landed here with a group of convicts and soldiers in 1803 is surrounded by posters of Aboriginal protests and the handing over of the land in 1995The historic landing-place is covered in weeds and deteriorating. I walked up the hill to the place the first house was built and could only see a portion of the foundations and a few bricks strewn around.

It was an interesting experience. I was on my own in this historic place and I could feel and visualize the past. The strangeness for both cultures of the other parties. Even today with the sound of the traffic roaring by on the road below it has a feeling of remoteness. The views across the Derwent river where Hobart now stands, in 1803 would be bush and gum trees.

Destination around the back of the hill

Destination around the back of the hill

 

 Risdon cove

Can you see the white herons?

Can you see the white herons?

Dinner time for the herons

Dinner time for the herons

 

Monument to John Bowen

Monument to John Bowen surrounded by Aboriginal posters

 

Historic landing stage, very neglected, as a statement by the Aboriginals

Historic landing stage, very neglected, as a statement by the Aboriginals

 

Risdon Cove

The place were Restdown, the name given to the first house built on this site 1812

The place were Restdown, the name given to the first house built on this site 1833

 

These foundations are all that is left of the original first building

These foundations are all that is left of the original first building

 

Imagine what this would look like 200 years ago

Imagine what this would look like 200 years ago before Hobart was built

 

Risdon Cove

Poster of the hand over of the land 1995

Poster of the hand over of the land 1995

Risdon Cove

 

This is a controversial place and I walked back along the road to catch the bus with very mixed feelings. To me this place even with all its neglect and desolation was beautiful, it had a spiritual aura. The large number of water birds in the unpolluted stream, the reflections of the trees giving a feeling of peace. It touched me more than the pristine museums with the exhibits laid out under glass and carefully labelled.

It was an interesting day and the best part? It only cost me $3-20 for my concession day pass and the price of 2 coffees and a muffin. That is budget travelling.

I checked it out on Google, the history is certainly controversial. You can read a version of it here 

 

 

 

Advertisements
Categories: aboriginal history, Aboriginal history, Australia, Hobart, photos, Risdon Cove, Tasmania | Tags: , , , , , | 20 Comments

Post navigation

20 thoughts on “Out and About Budget Style

  1. How wonderful place. I find Your post very interesting.

    Like

  2. Looking through the comments above, I saw that many of my own feelings were noted by others too. The photos are superb, and our have captured that spiritual feeling beautifully.
    I really enjoyed going along on your tour – the weather looks perfect too.

    Like

    • I have been into lots of the museums and old heritage places but so far this site with all its neglect and controversy affected me the most

      Like

  3. Pingback: Lingering Look at Windows : Churches | Memories are made of this

  4. Thanks for the photo, wonder if you are coming North before you leave the State? Email me and maybe we can make the coffee together happen.

    Like

  5. Joan and Terry Watson

    The photos were so good I could feel the spirits and felt quite strange, all very sad as well.

    Like

  6. Hello! I love your blog and so I’ve nominated you for the One Lovely Blog award. See here:
    http://ladyofthecakes.wordpress.com/2013/05/27/my-first-award-one-lovely-blog/

    Like

  7. Nice post, photos sand wave paterns and those showds defining the hills I especially liked.

    Like

  8. It’s always fun exploring a new place – even if it is by bus and Shank’s pony!

    Like

  9. I had mixed feelings reading your post too; maybe one day I’ll get to see it for myself

    Like

    • There are a lot of untold stories over here in Australia. The Aboriginals have been denied a voice for a long time and they do not have any written history, it is all oral

      Like

  10. Wow! You certainly get around! That was very interesting and I love the pics.

    Like

I love to receive comments, maybe we could start a conversation.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Lucid Gypsy

Come away with the raggle taggle gypsy-o

Tish Farrell

Writer on the Edge

Postcards from Ian and Margaret

We are a couple of retirees, I started this blog as record of our caravan trips. However I have expanded it to include other travel adventures.

Zeebra Designs & Destinations

An Artist's Eyes Never Rest

suesilver

poems, commentary and photography

The Sacred Cave

Slowing down to notice the present moment...

Igor Bilek

"Life is an adventure, not a package tour" ~ Eckhart Tolle ~

The Daily Post

The Art and Craft of Blogging

Where's my backpack?

Romancing the planet; a love affair with travel.

fulltimelayabout

Photos of my home town

Belle Grove Plantation Bed and Breakfast

Birthplace of James Madison and Southern Plantation

ishooteditnblog

Every picture has a story to tell

Memories are made of this

I need photos to keep my memories alive

soitgoes1

Just another WordPress.com site

the vibes

Dreams of a Free Spirit

livingforcreativity

Living a life of creativity, via music, books and films.

In My View

The world as I see it -- by R C Norman

endeavor

my journal of creative expression

%d bloggers like this: