Turtle Encounter…

Taking "Our girls" statistics

Taking “Our girls” statistics

This is one of the wild life experiences that has been on my “too-do list” for a long time.

Finally I am in the right place at the right time.

It is almost a full moon, the weather is warm and balmy with a slight breeze blowing in from the ocean and the turtles are arriving, as they have done for thousands of years. The Mon Repos beach at Bundaberg is one of the main beaches in Australia where the loggerhead turtles drag themselves up to dig a hole in the sand and lay their eggs.

The turtles are on the endangered species list and the egg laying turtles are monitored and the viewing experience carefully controlled by the rangers. People are only allowed on the beach between dusk and dawn in a group and accompanied by a ranger. No photos are allowed whilst the turtle is laying her eggs and every one must stay 3 metres away from the turtle.

This all sounds very sterile and organised but the experience of seeing these animals is quite special. “Our girl”, as the ranger referred to her, seemed oblivious to the crowds and every one spoke in whispers. After she had finished laying 156 eggs she laboriously filled in the hole, flipping the sand high and over the nearer spectators, I wonder if this was deliberate??? At this point the ranger said we could take photos. Then the ranger moved us back so a path back to the ocean was cleared and she slowly made her way back into her natural environment. The moon created silver ripples as she disappeared. “Our girl” had been recorded 4 times coming to lay eggs, the previous year being 2008. They don’t start laying until they are 30 years old so “Our girl” could be around 50 years old.

Watching as she fills in her hole. Look at the expression on the faces.

Watching as she fills in her hole. Look at the expression on the faces.

That wasn’t the end of the evening because the eggs had to be moved. The turtle had dug the hole too close to the high tide mark and during storms or extra high king tides the nest would be swamped. So the ranger dug the eggs up, an identical sized hole was dug in the dunes and we all helped to transfer the leathery textured eggs to the new position…

The babies will hatch in approximately 6-8 weeks.

(Now I will attempt to put in some photos, fingers crossed…)

Digging out the eggs

"Our girl" laid 156 eggs, that is more than normal, usually 60-80 are laid

“Our girl” laid 156 eggs, that is more than normal, usually 60-80 are laid

This little boy was 4 years old and the only child there

This little boy was 4 years old and the only child there

Many hands made light work...

Many hands made light work…

The eggs were then carefully put into the new hole.

The eggs were then carefully put into the new hole.

For more information about the turtles click here.

The beach next morning

The beach next morning

We walked approx 500 metres along the beach to the place our turtle laid her eggs and they had 4 turtles come in to lay during the evening. The rangers are on duty all night to record and monitor them and protect them. Slowly the numbers of turtles coming each year is increasing. A lot more research is needed as so much is unknown about the life cycle.

Categories: Australia, travel, turtles egg laying | Tags: , , | 21 Comments

Post navigation

21 thoughts on “Turtle Encounter…

  1. Joan and Terry Watson

    Yes it is a wonderful experience, cannot remember the name of the place we did see them hatch,on the coast near Bagara, many years ago, we did not have to pay then, some escaped obviously, as we found some of the little ones in the Toilet Block we had fun sending them back to the sea, with a prayer.

    Like

  2. Pingback: Where Have All The Turtles Gone? | gypsy life

  3. What a wonderful experience. I will definitely have to put that on my to do list.

    Like

  4. jckorea

    I love the turtles. When I go diving at the Southport Seaway, I can pat them and scratch the algae off their shell. If I’m calm and pieceful then they hang around and enjoy my company!

    Like

    • Hi James, you are so lucky to have that experience with the turtles. I’ve heard that they can actually feel you scratching their shells

      Like

  5. What a fantastic experience

    Like

  6. Hi, this is one thing that I have so wanted to see but just not had a chance… it sounds fantastic 🙂

    Like

  7. This is absolutely fantastic! I’m so glad they’re doing something to help these beautiful creatures 😉

    Like

  8. Fantastic experience- no wonder it was on your ”to-do list” ! Hope you enjoyed it as much as you hoped you would.

    Like

    • I did enjoy the experience, amazingly the number of people that were in the group did not detract as you are focused on the turtle

      Like

  9. How awesome!

    Like

  10. Hey thanks Cindy, you have some pretty good tales to tell us too.

    Like

  11. Oh, how wonderful is this!! I swear Pomm, you have such wonderful adventures. No easy chair and cheesey novels for you!!! Loved this!

    Like

I love to receive comments, maybe we could start a conversation.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

priorhouse blog

Photos, art - and a little bit of LIT.

Life is great

Despite its troubles

Badfish & Chips Cafe

Travel photos, memoirs & letters home...from anywhere in the world

Circadianreflections Blog

Nature Photography by Deborah M. Zajac

The Day After

Musings, Photography, Writng, and More

Andrew's View of the Week

Andrew's view of the world in poetry, prose, and picture

musingsofafrequentflyingscientist.wordpress.com/

musings of a frequent flying scientist

Zimmerbitch

age is just a (biggish) number) NUMBER

Under a Cornish Sky

inspired by the colours of the land, sea and sky of Cornwall

The World according to Dina

Notes on Seeing, Reading & Writing, Living & Loving in The North

NewEnglandGardenAndThread

Master Gardener, amateur photographer, intermediate quilter and lover of day trips around New England

Etcetera Etcetera Etcetera

... about nothing in particular, because "Candid photography is like a box of chocolates. You never know what you're gonna get". Photography by Lignum Draco, "The Wood Dragon" since 2013.

Travels and Trifles

Expressing Thought Through Photography

This, that and the other thing

Looking at life through writing and photography

Tony Tomeo

Horticulturist, Arborist and Garden Columnist

The Glasgow Gallivanter

Adventures at home and abroad

itchingforhitching

a light hearted look at caravanning through the eyes of a couple of grey nomads.

%d bloggers like this: