The warm, balmy tropical winter weather of Northern Territory, we love it…

The climate is now tropical, a warm 30-32 degrees during the day and only drops to approx 16-17 at night. The sun shines from a clear blue sky. I have stowed away the oil heater and brought out the fan. Jack has discarded his thermals and wooly socks and I have dug out the summer shorts and tops from the bottom box, putting away the jackets, track pants and sweaters. It is now summer on the road and what we have travelled north to find.

I decided that now we do not need power to run a heater, an absolute necessity through the central desert areas when night-time temperatures can drop to 3-4 degrees, we can stay on unpowered campgrounds. So 3 days ago, when we left Katherine, we did a 20 kilometre side trip to Edith Falls National Park.

We arrived at midday and, oh dear, the swarms of people, the car park was crammed, the swimming hole was full of high-spirited, i.e. rowdy, children. We looked at each other, not our scene. So we decided to have lunch and a cuppa, then move on. Then I realised it was a public holiday; picnic day.(not sure what the significance of this holiday is). Feeling more relaxed after a sandwich and coffee we rationalized they will all be back at work and school tomorrow.So we decided we are here now we may as well walk up to the top pool and waterfall and stay the night.

Looks easy on the map…

There are a series of pools joined by cascading waterfalls. The bottom pool, where all the children are playing, is just behind the campground. A 2.6 kilometre round walk takes you up the escarpment to the top pool. a further 8 kilometre trek takes you to the headwaters. We opt for the 2.6 round walk to the top pool

What goes up must come down…

Our fitness levels are not as good as previous years so it is a leisurely, ie slow amble, to the top pool. Lots of steps and rough ground and lots of photo stops!!!! The destination was well worth the journey.

Looking down to the bottom pool from the top pool

Edith falls

After slowly lowering the hot body into the clear, fresh plunge pool below the waterfall and the accompanying gasp, it was blissfully refreshing. Not many people in this pool and only a couple of children.

Jack jumps in I take the photo then follow him

We arrive back at camp as the sun sets, turning the rocks of the escarpment to a molten gold colour.

With glass of wine in hand, feeling so relaxed,we watch the stars appear and the sky turn to velvet. The car park is now empty, all the day-trippers have gone home. It is so quiet we can just hear the distant murmur of the waterfalls.

Next morning we almost have the campground to ourselves. So for the first time this trip we set up the solar panel and decide to stay another day.

Evening reflections in the river

Escarpment reflections

Kapok flowers dance like butterflies in the bush

Grevillea native flower

Beautiful arial perspective

Smoke haze at sunset

The next day we walked part way up the escarpment to watch the sunset. It had an ethereal, mystic look as this time of the year, winter, is “cold burn” time. It is a method of management and control in the bush lands. It has been used for thousands of years by the Aboriginal traditional owners to keep undergrowth down and help prevent summer bush fires and also creates new growth which brought the wild life into their areas for food. Many of the native Australian plants actually need fire to open seed cases and start new plants growing. A very complex system. It is known as patch work burning and the air has a hazy smokey atmosphere most of the time. It is now used by National Park management too.

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Categories: aboriginal history, Australia, australian travel, camping australia, Northern Territory, out back, photos, travel | Tags: , , , , , | 12 Comments

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12 thoughts on “The warm, balmy tropical winter weather of Northern Territory, we love it…

  1. Stunning views 🙂

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  2. Joan and Terry Watson

    WOW what can one say how beautiful is that Joan and Terry

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  3. Am remembering the Kapok trees from childhood in Florida in early ’60’s… What a glorious day for you both – thanks so much for sharing it, and photos! Whilst you’re off the grid will search for other mentions of your solar panel. Wonderful that you’ve got a portable!

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  4. This area is beautiful. What lovely pools and waterfalls! I bet that water really felt wonderful. I didn’t know that the Australian mosssies carried Dengue fever either. I look forward to your next post.

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  5. beautiful place…. the word that immediately comes to my mind for it are serene and calm….

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    • I agree,perfect words, and no mosquitoes!!!

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      • I thought there were no mosquitoes in Australia and NZ. It is a species available only in Africa and India

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        • There are plaques of mossies in areas of both Aus and NZ, especially wetland areas. Up here in tropical Australia there are the denque fever and ross river virus and. maleria bearing mossies. Tomorrow we go into Kakadu which is tropical wetland and flood plains, thick with mossies.It is heritage listed national park, no internet connection so it will be a while before I am back on line. That is if I don’t get carried away by the mossies, they love my pomme blood. 😦

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          • Thanks for the info. I didn’t know that dengue etc was also prevalent in developed countries. Have fun and look forward to more interesting posts soon.

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            • Not quite so bad in the winter months (now) but still have to put lots of mossie repelant on especially in Kakadu wetlands

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